napa humane

Napa Humane Vaccination Services

Napa Humane promotes a healthy pet and human population by offering low cost vaccinations for dogs and cats.  Please note that the vaccinations offered at Napa Humane Spay/Neuter Clinic are the core vaccinations given without examination.  An initial “well pet” examination and then annual examinations with a full service veterinary clinic are always recommended for the health of your pet and to determine if your pet should receive additional vaccinations given your circumstances and environment. 

Napa Humane follows the University of California at Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine vaccination recommendations with regard to administering “core” vaccinations.

Vaccination Guidelines for Dogs

DHPP – Canine Distemper, Canine Hepatitis, Canine Parvovirus, Canine Parainfluenza

Vaccination Schedule

 

1st Vaccine

2nd Vaccine

3rd Vaccine

Booster

Thereafter

Puppies

8 weeks

12 weeks

16 weeks

One year later

Every three years

Dogs with unknown vaccination history

Any age

Four weeks later

N/A

One year later

Every three years

Canine Distemper

  • Distemper is widespread, serious, often deadly, and can affect almost any dog.  Canine distemper is a contagious viral disease, seen most frequently in puppies three- to six-months old, but dogs of all ages are at risk.  

Canine Hepatitis

  • A viral infection caused by an adenovirus present worldwide. This disease infects the liver, eye, nervous tissue, lungs, and kidney. It is commonly spread through the urine and saliva of dogs. Signs include increased thirst, lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, corneal opacity (blue eye), and bleeding tendencies. Most symptoms are those associated with hepatitis. This disease carries a moderate mortality risk.

Canine Parvovirus

  • This is a widespread virus that is spread through feces in the environment. Puppies with this infection have gastrointestinal symptoms including vomiting, dehydration, loss of appetite, and severe diarrhea with or without blood. Most puppies are hospitalized for treatment and the disease carries a moderate mortality rate. This virus can infect the heart muscle.

Canine Parainfluenza

  • Parainfluenza is a common, though highly contagious, viral upper respiratory disease. The signs may be very mild, but may progress if other conditions exist. Since signs are mild, the disease can be spread to other unprotected dogs without being readily noticed. Transmitted by sneezing or coughing (nasal secretions by infected dogs), Parainfluenza contributes to upper respiratory disease and infectios tracheobronchitis (kennel cough).

Rabies

Vaccination Schedule

 

1st Vaccine

2nd Vaccine

Thereafter

Puppies

16 weeks

One year later

Every three years

Dogs with unknown vaccination history

Any age

One year later

Every three years

Rabies

  • Rabies is a disease caused by a virus found in the saliva of infected animals and is transmitted to pets and humans by bites, or possibly by contamination of an open cut. Treatment of an infected person as critical. Untreated, rabies causes a painful death.  Most animals can be infected by the virus and can transmit the disease to man. Infected bats, raccoons, foxes, skunks, dogs, or cats provide the greatest risk to humans.

Vaccination Guidelines for Cats

FVRCP - Feline Herpesvirus 1, Feline Calicivirus and Feline Panleukopenia Virus

Vaccination Schedule

 

1st Vaccine

2nd Vaccine

3rd Vaccine

Booster

Thereafter

Kittens

8 weeks

12 weeks

16 weeks

One year later

Every three years

Cats with unknown vaccination history

Any age

Four weeks later

N/A

One year later

Every three years

Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis

  • This is a severe upper respiratory infectionn that is most dangerous to young kittens and older cats. The virus is extremely contagious to cats, and is caused by a feline herpes virus. FVR can leave some catss with permanent respiratory system and optical damage.

Feline Calcivirus

  • There are several different strains of calcivirus, causing a range of illness from mild infection to life-threatening pneumoniaa.  The more dangerous strains can be deadly to young kittens and older cats. Calcivirus is transmitted through direct contact with an infected cat or an infected item. A carrier cat can pass the virus on for up to one year.

 Feline Panleukopeniaa

  • Panleukopenia is also known as feline distemper. Feline distemper is a highly contagious disease that moves very quickly through the system. It is caused by a parvovirus similar to the parvovirus seen in dogs. As many as ninety percent of young kittens (under six months old) with panleukopenia do not survive the virus. The disease is most severe in young kittens but can affect cats of all ages. Panleukopenia may remain active in the environment for up to a year without a host.

Rabies

Vaccination Schedule

 

1st Vaccine

2nd Vaccine

Thereafter

Kittens

16 weeks

One year later

Every three years

Cats with unknown vaccination history

Any age

One year later

Every three years

Rabies

  • Rabies is a disease caused by a virus found in the saliva of infected animals and is transmitted to pets and humans by bites, or possibly by contamination of an open cut. Treatment of an infected person as critical. Untreated, rabies causes a painful death.  Most animals can be infected by the virus and can transmit the disease to man. Infected bats, raccoons, foxes, skunks, dogs, or cats provide the greatest risk to humans.

FeLV- Feline Leukemia Virus Vaccine

Vaccination Schedule

 

1st Vaccine

2nd Vaccine

Booster

Thereafter

Kittens

10 weeks

14 weeks

One year later

Yearly

Cats

Any age

4 weeks later

One year later

Yearly

Feline Leukemia Virus Vaccine

  • Feline leukemia virus adversely affects the cat's body in many ways. It is the most common cause of cancer in cats, it may cause various blood disorders, and it may lead to a state of immune deficiency that hinders the cat's ability to protect itself against other infections. The same bacteria, viruses, protozoa, and fungi that may be found in the everyday environment—where they usually do not affect healthy animals—can cause severe illness in those with weakened immune systems. These secondary infections are responsible for many of the diseases associated with FeLV.